Final 15 New Rules of Work

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Here is the last of the list, we hope that you continue to quietly consider implementing them as well as discussing them at your next team meeting:   
 
1. Remember that a job is only just a job if all you see it as is a job. 

2. Don’t do your best work for the applause it generates but for the personal pride it delivers. 

3. The only standard worth reaching for is BIW (Best In World). 

4. In the new world of business, everyone works in Human Resources. 

5. In the new world of business, everyone’s part of the Leadership Team. 

6. Words can inspire. And words can destroy. Choose yours well. 

7. You become your excuses. 

8. You’ll get your game-changing ideas away from the office versus in the middle of work. Make time for solitude. Creativity needs the space to present itself. 

9. It could take you 30 years to build a great reputation and 30 seconds of bad judgment to lose it. 

10. The client is always watching. 

11. The way you do one thing defines the way you’ll do everything. Every act matters. 

12. People want to be inspired to pursue a vision. It’s your job to give it to them. 

13. The purpose of work is to help people. The other rewards are inevitable by-products of this singular focus. 

14. Remember that the things that get scheduled are the things that get done. 

15. Keep promises and be impeccable with your word. People buy more than just your products and services. They invest in your credibility. 

           Reproduced with kind permission from Robin Sharma

Another 15 New Rules of Work

Rules 2

With the hope that you continue to quietly consider implementing them as well as discussing them at your next team meeting:

1. Good enough just isn’t good enough.

2. Brilliant things happen when you go the extra mile for every single customer.

3. An addiction to distraction is the death of creative production. Enough said.

4. If you’re not failing regularly, you’re definitely not making much progress.

5. Lift your teammates up versus tear your teammates down. Anyone can be a critic. What takes guts is to see the best in people.

6. Remember that a critic is a dreamer gone scared.

7. Leadership’s no longer about position. Now, it’s about passion. And having an impact through the genius-level work that you do.

8. The bigger the dream, the more important the team.

9. If you’re not thinking for yourself, you’re following – not leading.

10. Work hard. But build an exceptional family life. What’s the point of reaching the mountaintop but getting there alone?

11. The job of the leader is to develop more leaders.

12. The antidote to deep change is daily learning. Investing in your professional and personal development is the smartest investment you can make. Period.

13. Smile. It makes a difference.

14. Say “please” and “thank you”. It makes a difference.

15. Shift from doing mindless toil to doing valuable work.

               To be continued:

Reproduced with kind permission from Robin Sharma

15 New Rules of Work

Rules

15 New Rules of Work – With the hope that you quietly consider implementing them as well as discussing them at your next team meeting:

1. You are not just paid to work. You are paid to be uncomfortable – and to pursue projects that scare you.

2. Take care of your relationships and the money will take care of itself.

3. Lead you first. You can’t help others reach for their highest potential until you’re in the process of reaching for yours.

4. To double your income, triple your rate of learning.

5. While victims condemn change, leaders grow inspired by change.

6. Small daily improvements over time create stunning results.

7. Surround yourself with people courageous enough to speak truthfully about what’s best for your organization and the customers you serve.

8. Don’t fall in love with your press releases.

9. Every moment in front of a customer is a moment of truth (to either show you live by the values you profess – or you don’t).

10. Copying what your competition is doing just leads to being second best.

11. Become obsessed with the user experience such that every touchpoint of doing business with you leaves people speechless. No, breathless.

12. If you’re in business, you’re in show business. The moment you get to work, you’re on stage. Give us the performance of your life.

13. Be a Master of Your Craft. And practice + practice + practice.

14. Read magazines you don’t usually read. Talk to people who you don’t usually speak to. Go to places you don’t commonly visit. Disrupt your thinking so it stays fresh + hungry + brilliant.

15. Remember that what makes a great business – in part – are the seemingly insignificant details. Obsess over them.

Reproduced with kind permission of Robin Shrma

How to bounce back from failure

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Remind yourself that you’re bound to get better.

Don’t get down on yourself. Don’t beat yourself up. It’s the next opportunity that matters, not the previous one. The previous one matters only in that you must learn from your mistakes. But the next one gives you the opportunity to show that you have learned from your mistakes. You can do it better next time. You just have to practice. Keep trying until. If you figured out what went wrong last time, then you know how to make it right next time. Don’t beat yourself up for messing up. Pat yourself on the back for figuring it out.

You need to encourage yourself. You need to pump yourself up. Why? Because you can’t wait and hope that someone else will come along and cheer you up, make you feel better, tell you that you’ll do better next time. You have to rely on yourself. You have to have faith in yourself and your ability to figure out what works and what doesn’t. You have to have the inner belief that everything you’re doing you’re doing for a positive outcome in the future. You have to encourage yourself with future successes.

When you miss an opportunity, are unprepared for an opportunity or suffer a setback while realizing your goals, you need to encourage yourself by immediately getting back in line. If you fall off track, get right back on. If you fall away from your disciplines, get right back to them. If you fall out of habit, get back into it. Something goes wrong, do what you can to make it right. It might be hard. It might be scary. Keep your resolve alive, active and well. Cheer yourself on to victory. You can do it.

Sometimes defeat is the best beginning. Why? If you’re at the bottom, there’s only one way to go. Up. But more importantly, if you’re flat on your back, mentally and financially, you’ll usually become sufficiently disgusted to reach way deep down inside yourself and pull out miracles and talents and abilities and desire and determination. When you’re flat broke or flat miserable, you’ll eventually become so disgusted that you’ll pull out the basic essentials required to make everything better.

Reproduced with kind permission of Jim Rohn

The Value of Dying Daily

live like last day

I don’t want to be the richest person in the graveyard. To me, a life well-lived is mostly about being surrounded by people I love, staying healthy and happy (and no one’s happy all the time except in the movies) and having an impact on the world around us. So how can you stay focused on the things that are most important to you? Die daily.

I wrote about this in The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari but the point of wisdom is simply this: connecting to the fact that life is short and no one knows when it will end is a great personal practice to stay engaged on your priorities. Waking up each morning and asking yourself “how would I show up today if this day was my last” is not some cheesy motivational exercise. It’s a profound way to bring some urgency and commitment into your days.

Most of us let life act on us – we are asleep at the wheel of our own lives. And the days slip into weeks, the weeks into months and the months into years. Before we know it, we are laying on our deathbeds wondering where all the time went.

Die daily. Give yourself to life. Take some risks. Open your heart a little wider. Speak your truth. Show your respect for the gift of life that’s been given to you. Shine brightly today. And then, wake up tomorrow and reach even higher. At the end, people will remember you as one of the great ones.

Reproduced with kind permission from Robin Sharma

Do Your Part

make a list

Big question for you: “what are you doing to help build a new and better world?” Don’t blame the politicians. Don’t blame those around you. Don’t blame your parents or your background. Doing so is playing the victim and this world has far too many people playing the victim when they could be shining and making a profound difference. Mother Teresa said it so much better than I ever could: “if each of us would only sweep their own doorstep, the whole world would be clean.” Nice.

Blaming others is excusing yourself. Telling yourself that you – as an army of one – cannot have an impact is giving away your power. A couple of college kids got their hands on empty school buses and drove them into New Orleans when everybody else said the city was unapproachable. A little man in a loincloth named Mohandas Gandhi freed an entire nation. A college student named Richard Branson took some initiative to start a record label on a shoestring that has since morphed into the Virgin empire. You are no different from them. We are all flesh and bones – cut from the same cloth.

In a recent issue of Vanity Fair, Jennifer Aniston said that she gives herself one day to play victim after a challenging event. After that day of feeling sorry for herself and powerless, she wakes up and takes ownership over the way her life looks. And if she doesn’t like a piece of it she sets about to change it. That’s personal leadership.

What don’t you like about your life or the organization you work for or the country you live in? Make a list. Write it down. Shout it out. And then do something to improve things. Anything. Start small or go big. Just do something. Today. Now. The world will be better for it.

Reproduced with kind permission from Robin Sharma

3 Things to Do When You Make a Mistake

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Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we had as much foresight as hindsight, if we were able to avoid ever making a mistake?

Not only is that unrealistic, it’s unwise… Out of mistakes come major accomplishments—because mistakes are often the springboard for success.
Once, Thomas Edison was working with a lab assistant who was coming up dry after more than 700 experiments. In discouragement, he told Edison that after all these mistakes, errors and false starts, he simply did not believe the project was valid.

Edison quickly told him that he was not wasting his time, that he now knew more about the project than anybody alive—that he had not made “mistakes” but had acquired an “education” as to what would not work. And so the assistant went back to his project with renewed vigor.

It’s safe to say that if each of us took that approach to life, we would end up accomplishing much, much more. After every mistake, we need to understand that we can look back and learn so that we can move forward with confidence and avoid making the same mistake again.

Here are three tips on how best to handle a mistake:

1. See the mistake as a step on the road to a solution.
Don’t let mistakes depress or discourage you. We must realize that depression and discouragement are negatives that limit the future.

2. Admit the mistake.
I’ll admit that takes courage, but recognition of errors is a sign of maturity. Not to recognize them is to deny them. The reality is that “denial” is more than just a river in Egypt—it’s something that will limit your future.

3. Know that it’s only when you ignore the mistake that it is negative.
When we confront mistakes, we are taking full advantage of it as the “positive” they

Zig Ziglar September 2015

The Ant 4-Part Philosophy

ants

I think everybody should study ants. They have an amazing four-part philosophy.

Here is the First part: Ants never quit. That’s a good philosophy. If they’re headed somewhere and you try to stop them, they’ll look for another way. They’ll climb over, they’ll climb under, they’ll climb around. They keep looking for another way. What a neat philosophy, to never quit looking for a way to get where you’re supposed to go.

Second, ants think winter all summer. That’s an important perspective. You can’t be so naive as to think summer will last forever. So ants are gathering their winter food in the middle of summer.

The Third part of the ant philosophy is that ants think summer all winter.That is so important. During the winter, ants remind themselves, “This won’t last long—we’ll soon be out of here.” And the first warm day, the ants are out. If it turns cold again, they’ll dive back down, but then they come out the first warm day. They can’t wait to get out

And here’s the last part of the ant philosophy. How much will an ant gather during the summer to prepare for the winter? All he possibly can. What an incredible philosophy, the “all-you-possibly-can” philosophy.

What a grerat philosophy to have! Never give up, look ahead, stay positive and do all you can.

Reproduced with kind permission of Jim Rohn

13 Ways to Improve Your Life

Can a poor person bimprove your lifeecome wealthy? Of course! The unique combination of desire, planning, effort and perseverance will always work its magic. The question is not whether the formula for success will work, but rather whether the person will work the formula. That is the unknown variable. That is the challenge that confronts us all. We can all go from wherever we are to wherever we want to be. No dream is impossible provided we first have the courage to believe in it.

Here is how you can do that—13 ways to improve your life:

  1. Face your fears. That’s how you conquer them. Don’t dismiss them; face them. Say, Here’s what I’m afraid of. I wonder what I could do to change that. Face your fears today.
  1. Exercise your willpower to change direction. You don’t have to keep doing what you’ve been doing the last six years if it’s not yielding the benefits you want. Pick a new destination and go that way. Use your willpower to start the process. You don’t have to repeat last year. Clean up the errors. Invest it now in the next year. Watch it make the difference.
  1. Admit your mistakes. Sometimes you have to admit them to others. Here’s one of the best phrases in the English language: “I’m sorry.” Those words could start a whole new relationship. They could start two people going in a whole new direction. Admit your mistakes to yourself. You don’t have to babble about them to everyone in the neighborhood. But it doesn’t hurt you to sit down and have a conversation with yourself and say, There’s no use kidding myself. Here’s where I really am. I’ve got pennies in my pocket and I’ve got nothing in the bank. That’s what I said after a Girl Scout left my door. I had a conversation with myself and I said, I don’t want this to happen anymore.
  1. Refine your goals. Start the process. Set some higher goals. Reach for some higher purpose. Go for something beyond what you thought you could do.
  1. Believe in yourself. You’ve got to believe in the possibilities. You’ve got to believe that tomorrow can be better than today. Believe in yourself. There isn’t a skill you can’t learn; there isn’t a discipline you can’t try; there isn’t a class you can’t take; there isn’t a book you couldn’t read.
  1. Ask for wisdom. Ask for wisdom that creates answers. Ask for wisdom to deal with the challenges for today and tomorrow. Don’t wish it was easier; wish you were better.
  1. Conserve your time. Sometimes we get faked out. Motivational speaker Bill Bailey says the average person says, “I’ve got 20 more years.” But Bill says you’ve got 20 more times. If you go fishing once a year, you’ve only got 20 more times to go fishing, not 20 years. That fakes you out.
  1. Invest your profits. Here’s one of the philosophies that my mentor, Earl Shoaff, gave me: Profits are better than wages. Wages make you a living, profits make you a fortune. Could we start earning profits while we make a living? The answer is yes.
  1. Live with intensity You might as well turn it up a notch or two. Invest more of you in whatever you do. Be a little stronger; be a little wiser. Step up your vitality contribution. Put everything you’ve got into everything you do and then ask for more vitality, more strength and more vigor, more heart and more soul.
  1. Find your place. If you just work at a job, find the best place you can serve well, and sure enough they’ll ask you to occupy a better place. Keep doing a job well; do the very best you can. That’s your best way out.
  1. Demand integrity from yourself. Integrity is like loyalty. You can’t demand it of someone else; you can only demand it of yourself. Be the best example of loyalty and you’ll get loyal followers. Be the best example of integrity and you’ll have people around you who have integrity. Lead the way.
  1. Welcome the disciplines. I can’t give you much better advice than that because disciplines create reality. Disciplines build cities. A well-disciplined activity creates abundance, uniqueness and productivity.
  1. Fight for what’s right. It’s extraordinary to be able to say: “I fought for my kids; I fought for what was right; I fought for good health; I fought to protect my company; I fought for a good career that would bless my family. I fought a good fight.” It’s good to fight the encroachment. Opposites are in conflict and you’re in the middle. If you want something valuable, you’ve got to fight for it.

Reproduced with kind permission from Jim Rohn

8 Ways to be a Positive Communicator

shout whisper

1. Shout Praise, Whisper Criticism – This phrase comes from the original Olympic Dream Team and Detroit Pistons coaches Chuck Daily and Brendan Suhr. They won NBA Championships and an Olympic Gold medal with a lot of talent and great communication. They gained the trust of their players and built winning teams by praising in public and constructively criticizing in private. Shouting praise means you recognize someone in front of their peers and whispering criticism means you coach them to get better. Both build better people and teams.

2. Smile More – When you share a real smile it not only produces more serotonin in your brain but in the brain of the recipient of your smile. Just by smiling at someone you are giving them a dose of serotonin, an anti-depressant. Never underestimate the power of a smile. As a positive communicator you have the power to make someone feel better just by smiling.

3. Don’t Complain – When you complain you lose power, effectiveness and credibility as a communicator and leader. Most of all complaining is toxic and sabotages you and your team. Complaining is like vomiting. Afterwards you feel better but everyone around you feels sick. I know it’s a gross analogy but you’ll never forget it.

4. Encourage – Truett Cathy said, “How do you know if a man or woman needs encouragement? If they are breathing.” We all need encouragement and positive communicators encourage and inspire others to do more and become more than they ever thought possible. Great communicators are great encouragers.

5. Spread Positive Gossip – Instead of sharing negative gossip, be the kind of communicator who spreads positive news about people. My college lacrosse teammates Mike Connelly and Johnny Heil are famous for this. Whenever you talk to them they are always praising our mutual friends. “Did you hear how awesome so and so is doing? Their kids are doing great!” They never say a negative word about anyone. They always spread the positive news and the best part is that you know when you are not around they are likely sharing something positive, not negative about you.

6. Sometimes You Have to Listen More and Talk Less – Positive communicators don’t just talk. They listen. They ask questions and really listen. Research shows that when people feel like they are seen and heard there is a moistening in the eyes and yet in 90% of our conversations there is no moistening in the eyes. Positive communicators make others feel important by listening to them and truly hearing what they have to say.

7. Welcome Feedback – Positive communicators also listen to and welcome ideas and suggestions on how they can improve. They don’t fear criticism. They welcome it knowing it makes them better. They send a clear signal to their team, customers, coaches, etc. that they are always willing to learn, improve and grow. Positive communicators say “I’m open. Make me better. Let’s get better together.”

8. Celebrate Success – Instead of focusing on what went wrong each day, positive communicators focus on what went right. They celebrate their successes, even the small ones, knowing that small wins lead to big wins.

Reproduced with kind permission from Jon Gordon